Cuba's Japanese Owned Cafes

This is the second of a series of articles about work sites in which to trace out Japanese immigrants' presence in Cuba. I previously wrote about those who worked as gardeners in private estates and houses in the first half of the 20th century ("Cuba's Gardens: Japanese Gardeners (part 1 of 3)."

Now I will focus on Japanese that owned food-service businesses in the same period. In general, these were small shops (bar-cafes/bodegas, diners, taverns, canteens, cafeterias, and kiosks) that offered a homey and very affordable menu, such were the cases of Tsuhako's cafe-bar Merceditas, Tamaki's cafeteria La Iris, or Iwasaki's Tokio, a place that sold sugarcane juice.

Rolando Álvarez and Marta Guzmán explain in the book Japanese in Cuba that "given the way Japanese arrived in the country, almost always individually, their main interest was to find work, and make money in order to start some sort of business or go back to Japan with sufficient savings." As it will be seen in this and other articles of the series, they became an active part of Cuba's work landscape, starting their own cafes, mom-and-pop stores, barbershops, and laundromats, among other initiatives. The dream of returning to Japan, however, even if only to visit, in many cases proved to be a more difficult one to attain, and most of them never succeeded in going back. When some did, many decades after their initial departure, they found a country that didn't match their old memories of home. 

Zenshun Ishikawa talked about this in a 1970s' interview for a Japanese radio station. He was amazed at the changes he saw in Okinawa after his 48-year absence, with many new roads that had greatly transformed the previous rural panorama of disconnected villages and towns (Ishikawa arrived in Cuba in 1927). For my grandfather, Kanji Miyasaka, 1960s' modern-looking Tokyo felt almost like a foreign country, an understandable impression if taken into consideration that he left for Cuba in 1924. Koshun Nakasone expressed similar views in the 1981 documentary Japanese by Cuban filmmaker Idelfonso Ramos. Nakasone says that he arrived in Cuba in 1935, and when he visited Japan in the late 1970s he didn't find many things familiar anymore. 

 Zenshun  Ishikawa  (Center), Okinawa, 1970s

Zenshun  Ishikawa  (Center), Okinawa, 1970s

 Kanji  Miyasaka  (left),  Nagano , 1960s

Kanji  Miyasaka  (left),  Nagano , 1960s

 Koshun   Nakasone,  doc.   Japanese  (Japoneses) ,  1981

Koshun   Nakasone,  doc.  Japanese  (Japoneses),  1981

Still, there were some that departed Cuba to re-encounter and stay in Japan, or even emigrated to other countries. 

In any case, their life journeys routed them through many places in the first half of the 20th century, from private gardens to cafes, taverns, canteens, among many others; all valuable sites through which to map out the presence of Japanese immigrants in Cuba.

 senmatsu  and  Matsu  Tsuhako

senmatsu  and  Matsu  Tsuhako

In this picture from 1955, Senmatsu Tsuhako with his wife, Matsu, in their bar-cafe Merceditas in Nueva Gerona, on the Island of Pines. Their daughter, Catalina, recalls that it was named after their daughter Mercedes, who was very young at the time; also, that the shop was popularly known as The Japanese (La japonesa). Their other daughter, Cristina, told Benita Eiko Iha Sashida in the book Shamisen that "her father bought the bar in 1955, in collaboration with other people [or paisanos]," and various members of the Tsuhako family worked in it. 

 

 Kasei  Tamaki  (right)

Kasei  Tamaki  (right)

In the picture circa 1955, Kasei Tamaki in his cafeteria in Palma Soriano, in Santiago de Cuba province. Their grandson, Roberto Sánchez Tamaki, recalls that "it was located on Martí Street, between Cisneros and Callamo . . . My grand-parents' cafeteria was called The Iris (La Iris), but was popularly known as The Japanese (La Japonesa). They used to sell sandwiches, milkshakes and pastry, all of which they prepared after closing time at 11:00 p.m. . . . They were able to keep the cafeteria until 1967."  

 

 Hisao  Iwasaki  and  family

Hisao  Iwasaki  and  family

In the picture, Hisao Iwasaki and his wife, Cristela, with their son, José, and daughter, Margarita. Rolando González Cabrera writes in his book Japanese Saga in Cuba's Western Region that "Hisao acquired a tavern (or fonda) next to his house [in Consolación del Sur, in Pinar del Río province], where he sold Cuban food except when visited by Japanese friends, for whom he prepared Japanese dishes." Also, that next to his tavern Iwasaki opened a guarapera, that is a place to sell sugarcane juice (or guarapo), called Tokyo

 

Kanaishi  Matayoshi

In this photo, Kanaishi Matayoshi. Nerina Matayoshi Ríos remembers that her "paternal grandparents, Kanaishi Matayoshi and Mitsu Arakaki, had a store named Matayoshi House (Casa Matayoshi), in which they sold food, and it also included a sort of bar. It was located at 133 Maceo Street, in the town of Jatibonico in Santi Spíritus province, it was on a corner, on the Central Highway. I heard from relatives that my grandmother used to work with one of her children attached to her back in a sort of carrier. My grandparents had the bodega-bar since the 1940s (I don’t know if before), until it was nationalized in the 60s.”

 

 Goro  Naito  and  his  wife,  Luisa

Goro  Naito  and  his  wife,  Luisa

In this picture from 1950s, Goro Naito with his wife, Luisa, in their canteen (or cantina) in the Mercado Único, later known as Mercado de Cuatro Caminos (a very popular market in Havana City). Their son, Mario Naito, remembers that previous to this they had a "kiosk on Infanta and Clavel streets [in Havana City] that they must have had since 1946 or 1947, until 1952. Before the war [WWII], my father had a fruit stand in the Mercado Único, which he sold to someone that had a similar one, [this was] when he was in the prison on the Island of Pines. After the war, he bought the kiosk with the money that person gave him. Due to some widening work on Clavel street they couldn't keep their kiosk anymore, and with the money they were offered to move out they bought a small local in the Mercado Único . . . I always heard them call it a cantina (a word that comes from the English canteen), because there they used to sell drinks, coffee with milk, and cupcakes; it was a place where people could either have breakfast or a shot of rum. I don't remember if they sold beer or pops, or other type of sweets. They had the canteen until Cuban businesses were nationalized in 1961. 

 

Family photos, except last, were courtesy of Keiko Uyema, Kiyomi Torres, Roberto Sánchez Tamaki, Sayuri Martínez Ishikawa, Kenji Iwasaki, and Nerina Matayoshi Ríos. The last photo belongs to the book Tōge no bunkashi: Kyūba no Nihonjin (峠の文化史: キューバの日本人), by Kiyotaka Kurabe. The testimonies, except those from books, were obtained via digital interviews. I had access to Zenshun Ishikawa's radio interview thanks to Sayuri Martínez Ishikawa, and I would like to thank Francisco Miyasaka for translating it from Japanese to Spanish, as well as for documenting Catalina Tsuhako's testimony on my behalf. Title photo by Kennet Schmitz.

 

___________________ESPAÑOL___________________

 

 

 

Los cafés de los japoneses en Cuba

Este es el segundo de una serie de artículos sobre los lugares de trabajo de los inmigrantes japoneses en Cuba, para a través de estos sitios trazar un mapa de su presencia en isla en la primera mitad del siglo XX. En el primer artículo me enfoqué en los que trabajaron como jardineros, generalmente en haciendas o casas privadas ("Los jardines de Cuba: Jardineros japoneses (parte 1 de 3)".

En esta ocasión exploro el tema de los japoneses que fueron dueños de comercios de comida. Por lo general, eran establecimientos pequeños (bar-cafés, fondas, cantinas, cafeterías, y kioscos) que ofrecían un menú sencillo y barato; así fue en el caso del café-bar Merceditas, de Tsuhako, de la cafetería La Iris, de Tamaki, o de la guarapera Tokio, de Iwasaki.

Rolando Álvarez y Marta Guzmán explican en el libro Japoneses en Cuba que “[e]n la forma, casi siempre aislada, en la que llegaban a Cuba los japoneses, el interés supremo de éstos radicaba en encontrar trabajo, y hacerse de dinero para emprender algún negocio o regresar a su país con ahorros suficientes”. Los artículos de esta serie muestran que los inmigrantes japoneses se convirtieron en una parte activa del panorama laboral cubano, puesto que desarrollaron diversos negocios, como cafés, barberías, pequeñas tiendas familiares, y lavanderías, entre otras iniciativas. El sueño de ir a Japón resultó mucho más difícil de cumplir. La mayoría no logró regresar o incluso ir de visita, cuando algunos lo hicieron muchas décadas después de haber emigrado, encontraron un país que no era el mismo que tenían en la memoria.   

Zenshun Ishikawa habla de esto en una entrevista que le hicieran para un programa de radio japonés, en los años 70. Él comentaba que se había quedado muy sorprendido por los cambios que vio en su natal Okinawa al regresar 48 años después, con nuevas carreteras que habían transformado el panorama rural y de pueblos desconectados que él recordaba (Ishikawa llegó a Cuba en 1927). Para mi abuelo, Kanji Miyasaka, la modernidad de Tokio en los 60 le dio la impresión de estar en un país extranjero, algo entendible si se tiene en cuenta que emigró a Cuba en 1924. Koshun Nakasone expresó algo similar en el documental Japoneses, realizado por Idelfonso Ramos en 1981; Nakasone comenta que llegó a Cuba en 1935, y que cuando visitó Japón a finales de los 70 no sintió familiaridad con muchas cosas.  

 Zenshun  Ishikawa, Okinawa, dÉc ada  de  1970

Zenshun  Ishikawa, Okinawa, dÉcada  de  1970

 Kanji  Miyasaka  (izq.),  nagano,  D ÉC  ADA  DE  1960

Kanji  Miyasaka  (izq.),  nagano,  DÉCADA  DE  1960

  Koshun  Nakasone,  DOC.    JAPONESES  ,  1981

Koshun  Nakasone,  DOC.  JAPONESES,  1981

No obstante, algunos hicieron el viaje de regreso Japón y decidieron quedarse, o incluso emigraron a otros países.

De cualquier manera, los recorridos que tomaron sus vidas los llevó por muchos lugares en la primera mitad del siglo XX, desde jardines privados hasta cafés, tabernas, cantinas, entre otros. Todo estos sitios son valiosos porque a través de ellos se puede delinear la presencia de los inmigrantes japoneses en Cuba. 

 

  SENMATSU  AND  MATSU  TSUHAKO

SENMATSU  AND  MATSU  TSUHAKO

En esta foto de 1955, Senmatsu Tsuhako con su esposa, Matsu, en su bar-café Merceditas, en Nueva Gerona, Isla de Pinos. Su hija, Catalina, recuerda que lo nombraron así por su hija Mercedes, quien era muy joven en ese tiempo; y también que el establecimiento era popularmente conocido como La japonesa. Su otra hija, Cristina, dice en el libro Shamisén, escrito por Benita Eiko Iha Sashida, que “[e]n 1955 papá logra, con la colaboración de varios paisanos comprar un Bar-Café en Nueva Gerona, ahí trabajó luego toda la familia”. 

 

 Kasei  TAmaki  (Der.)

Kasei  TAmaki  (Der.)

En esta foto circa 1955, Kasei Tamaki en su cafetería en Palma Soriano, en la provincia de Santiago de Cuba. Su nieto, Roberto Sánchez Tamaki, cuenta que “estaba en la calle Martí, entre Cisneros y Callamo . . . La cafetería de mis abuelos se llama La Iris, pero era popularmente conocida como La Japonesa. Vendían sándwiches, batidos y dulces, todo lo cual era preparado por ellos después de cerrar a las 11:00 de la noche . . . Ellos pudieron mantener la cafetería hasta 1967”.    

 

 Hisao  Iwasaki  y  familia

Hisao  Iwasaki  y  familia

En la foto, Hisao Iwasaki y su esposa, Cristela, con sus hijos, José y Margarita. Rolando González Cabrera escribe en el libro La saga japonesa en el occidente cubano que “Hisao adquirió una fonda contigua a su residencia [en Consolación del Sur, en la provincia de Pinar del Río], en la que ofertaba comida criolla, haciendo una excepción cuando llegaban sus compañeros del oriente; para quienes ordenaba preparar aquellos tradicionales platos de su país. Al lado inauguró una guarapera que nombró Tokio”.

 

 Kanaishi  Matayoshi

Kanaishi  Matayoshi

En la foto, Kanaishi Matayoshi. Nerina Matayoshi Ríos cuenta que “mis abuelos por parte de padre, Kanaishi Matayoshi y Mitsu Arakaki, tenían una tienda que se llamaba Casa Matayoshi, en la que vendían comida y tenían como un bar. Estaba en la calle Maceo 133, en la ciudad de Jatibonico, provincia de Santi Spíritus, hacía esquina, en plena Carretera Central. Según cuenta mi familia, mi abuela trabajaba con uno de los niños en la espalda, en una especie de 'mochila’. Mis abuelos tuvieron la bodega-bar creo que desde antes de los años 40 (no sé si antes), hasta que lo nacionalizaron en los 60”.

 

 Goro  Naito  y   su  esposa, Luisa 

Goro  Naito  y   su  esposa, Luisa 

En esta foto de la década de 1950, Goro Naito con su esposa, Luisa, en su cantina en el Mercado Único, luego conocido como Mercado de Cuatro Caminos (un mercado muy popular en La Habana). Su hijo, Mario Naito, recuerda que antes de la cantina ellos tuvieron “el kiosco de Infanta y Clavel [en La Habana], lo tuvieron hasta el año 1952, deben haberlo tenido desde 1946 o 1947. Antes de la guerra, mi padre tenía una tarima de frutos menores en el Mercado Único, que se la dejó a uno que tenía una similar al lado cuando estuvo en prisión en la Isla de Pinos. Al concluir la guerra, con el dinero que le dio esa persona, fue que compró el kiosco. Por ampliar la calle Clavel, le pagaron un dinero porque ya no podía estar ahí el kiosco, y con eso compraron el localcito en el Mercado Único, de Cuatro Caminos. Yo siempre les oí decir que era una cantina (eso viene del inglés canteen), porque allí vendían bebidas, café con leche, panqué. O sea, se desayunaba, o se tomaba un traguito de ron. No recuerdo si expedían cervezas o refresco u otro tipo de golosina. Esto duró hasta el año 1961, en que nacionalizaron los comercios en Cuba.”  

 

Las fotos, excepto la última, fueron cortesía de Keiko Uyema, Kiyomi Torres, Roberto Sánchez Tamaki, Sayuri Martínez Ishikawa, Kenji Iwasaki, y Nerina Matayoshi Ríos. La última foto pertenece al libro Tōge no bunkashi: Kyūba no Nihonjin (峠の文化史: キューバの日本人), de Kiyotaka Kurabe. Los testimonios, excepto las citas de libros, se obtuvieron a través de entrevistas digitales. Tuve acceso a la entrevista de radio de Zenshun Ishikawa gracias a Sayuri Martínez Ishikawa, y quisiera agradecer a Francisco Miyasaka por traducirla del japonés al español, y por enviarme el testimonio de Catalina Tsuhako. La foto del título pertenece a Kennet Schmitz.